MSE News and Events

Edwin Fohtung and coworkers demonstrate an X-ray Bragg coherent diffractive imaging technique to spatially resolve the evolution of nanoscopic ferroelastic needle-like domains in individual BaTiO3 nanocrystals under external pressure, published in the May 2020 issue of Advanced Electronic Materials and selected for the back cover.
With input from our students, we have adjusted the curriculum for the ARCH Summer 2020 semester to focus on skill sets that can be developed remotely including data dexterity, modeling, simulations and engineering math techniques. Laboratory-intensive courses previously scheduled for the summer will now be offered in the Spring and Fall 2021 semesters.
Prof. Liping Huang has been selected to became a fellow of the American Ceramics Society in recognition of her contributions to fundamental understanding of atomic structure and mechanical behavior of amorphous materials.
Professor Pawel Keblinski was named 2020 Materials Research Society Fellow for influential contributions to the development of computational methods leading to fundamental understanding of thermal transport in materials on nanometer length scales.
Ravishankar Sundararaman has been selected as the 2020 recipient of the AIME Robert Lansing Hardy Award from TMS. He will receive the award at the TMS Annual Meeting in San Diego on Feb 26, 2020.

Institute News

A COVID-19 transmission model inspired by gas-phase chemistry is helping the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) forecast COVID-19 deaths across the country.

Developed by Yunfeng Shi, an associate professor of materials science and engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and Jeff Ban, a professor of civil engineering at the University of Washington, the model uses fatality data collected by Johns Hopkins University and mobility data collected by Google to predict disease spread based on how much a population is moving within its community.

A COVID-19 transmission model inspired by gas-phase chemistry is helping the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) forecast COVID-19 deaths across the country.

Developed by Yunfeng Shi, an associate professor of materials science and engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and Jeff Ban, a professor of civil engineering at the University of Washington, the model uses fatality data collected by Johns Hopkins University and mobility data collected by Google to predict disease spread based on how much a population is moving within its community.

Bioimaging technologies are the eyes that allow doctors to see inside the body in order to diagnose, treat, and monitor disease.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide for men and women. The most common type of heart disease, coronary artery disease, is caused when plaque builds up along the walls of arteries that carry blood to the heart. It is often diagnosed through a cardiac computed tomography (CT) scan, which shows doctors if arteries are narrowing.

Carbon capture technologies play a critical role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from power plants and factories, while harnessing carbon dioxide (CO2) for other energy production.

With the support of a grant from the Department of Energy, Miao Yu, the Priti and Mukesh Chatter ’82 Career Development Chair of Chemical and Biological Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, will develop a novel porous material capable of capturing even very small concentrations of CO2 in the air and collecting the gas for further use